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'Bitcoin Maven' sentenced to a year in prison for money laundering

The Justice Department also alleged that Tetley made $6 million worth of bitcoin-for-cash exchanges with William James Farber, a Los Angeles man charged last summer with running an Altadena drug ring that sold cannabis on dark-web marketplaces Silk Road and AlphaBay. Tetley was charged with money laundering and operating an unlicensed money-transmitting business and pleaded guilty to both charges in January. It’s not illegal to exchange bitcoin or other digital currencies for cash, but Tetley did so without obeying federal rules that require banks and other financial firms to report suspicious activity and large cash transactions — measures that aim to curb money laundering by drug traffickers or other illegal businesses. Bitcoin and other virtual currencies, which are not issued by governments and can be directly exchanged from person to person without going through banks or other regulated institutions, are a preferred payment method for dark-web transactions. But those who accept virtual currency payments for illicit transactions may have a difficult time exchanging those holdings for real currency — unless they find someone like Tetley who would not report suspicious activity to federal regulators. Brian Klein, one of Tetley’s attorneys, called the 12-month sentence a victory, noting that it is substantially shorter than the 30-month sentence sought by federal prosecutors. In a sentencing document submitted to the court, her attorneys argued that Tetley, though guilty, “did not set out to engage in a broad-ranging criminal enterprise.” “We are pleased the judge made such a dramatic departure,” Klein said. The U.S. attorney’s office argued in court filings that Tetley should have received a longer sentence because her conduct showed she knew or should have known some of her clients were engaging in illegal activity.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-bitcoin-sentencing-20180709-story.html

She offered to exchange $300,000 in cash — carried in two Trader Joe’s paper grocery bags — for bitcoin held by an undercover DEA agent posing as a drug dealer, prosecutors said. The Justice Department also alleged that Tetley made $6 million worth of bitcoin-for-cash exchanges with William James Farber, a Los Angeles man charged last summer with running an Altadena drug ring that sold cannabis on dark-web marketplaces Silk Road and AlphaBay. Tetley was charged with money laundering and operating an unlicensed money-transmitting business and pleaded guilty to both charges in January. It’s not illegal to exchange bitcoin or other digital currencies for cash, but Tetley did so without obeying federal rules that require banks and other financial firms to report suspicious activity and large cash transactions — measures that aim to curb money laundering by drug traffickers or other illegal businesses. Bitcoin and other virtual currencies, which are not issued by governments and can be directly exchanged from person to person without going through banks or other regulated institutions, are a preferred payment method for dark-web transactions. But those who accept virtual currency payments for illicit transactions may have a difficult time exchanging those holdings for real currency — unless they find someone like Tetley who would not report suspicious activity to federal regulators. Brian Klein, one of Tetley’s attorneys, called the 12-month sentence a victory, noting that it is substantially shorter than the 30-month sentence sought by federal prosecutors. In a sentencing document submitted to the court, her attorneys argued that Tetley, though guilty, “did not set out to engage in a broad-ranging criminal enterprise.” “We are pleased the judge made such a dramatic departure,” Klein said. The U.S. attorney’s office argued in court filings that Tetley should have received a longer sentence because her conduct showed she knew or should have known some of her clients were engaging in illegal activity.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-bitcoin-sentencing-20180709-story.html

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